Posts Taged working-mothers

A tale of two cities: ACME shows how good employee relations made good business sense

In addition to being an incredible A. Wordsmith client and a brilliant business partner to some of Portland, Seattle and San Diego’s biggest and best companies, ACME Business Consulting is a really great place to work. Sara Fritsch, ACME’s marketing team lead, has worked with ACME for nine years in a variety of roles. Today her life is based in Amsterdam, and her beautiful, colorful life was recently featured on the blog Design Mom in it’s “Call It A Day” section.

ACME Business Consulting has three offices -- Portland, Seattle and San Diego -- and experienced a compound annual growth rate of 33 percent, with the addition of 20 new clients in the last three years alone.

ACME Business Consulting has three offices — Portland, Seattle and San Diego — and experienced a compound annual growth rate of 33 percent, with the addition of 20 new clients in the last three years alone.

 

Sara is a working mom, telecommuting from Europe to Oregon, making her way through her expat life on a Dutch cargo bike that can haul as many as five kids at a time. The Design Mom feature is a great peak inside her life, but it also highlights yet another great example of non-traditional professional positions — outside the 9-to-5 office grind — working to add dimension to a company’s brand.

What would your dream working situation be? Do you imagine a day when you could work from a beach in Thailand? Or if you could, would you split your time between a paid job and a passion project? Sara and ACME are living proof that the nontraditional is not only possible, it can be a dream come true.

For a fun look inside Sara’s life, check out the Design Mom feature here: http://www.designmom.com/2015/04/call-it-a-day-sara-fritsch/

Sara lives in Amsterdam with her husband and two kids.

Sara lives in Amsterdam with her husband and two kids.

From One Working Mother to Another

working mother

A frustrating truth

Today a powerful column appeared on Fortune.com. It was written by Katharine Zaleski, a former journalistic powerhouse who held top roles at The Huffington Post and The Washington Post in her mid-20s.  She is open and honest about how she viewed and treated women who were mothers during that time. Honestly recalling how she killed a potential partnership with an online editor because of the number of kid photos the lady had up in her office; also confessing her agreement to fire a woman “before she got pregnant”; sharing that she regularly scheduled meetings at 4:30pm, dismissing the fact that working mothers may need to be leaving to get their kids from daycare; and admitting to looking down on mothers who couldn’t join happy hour functions because of family commitments.  Wow.

Today this same woman is a working mother – with a very different perspective. After having her daughter she resigned from her role in journalism and founded her own business, PowerToFly, a technology company geared at helping mothers find work they can do virtually from home. She readily admits that “mothers are the people you need on your team” and is proud to share that the editor she dissed because of the children photos is now the executive editor at PowerToFly. IMG_4672

Since the column first appeared earlier today the social media world lit up with comments and shares, most overwhelmingly positive toward Katharine for admitting her previous short-comings and furthering the conversation on this controversial topic.

Life as a working mother

What it means to be a working mother is hard to describe. Just because we are mothers does not mean we have lost our will, or ability, or drive to work hard. And just because we want to work does not mean we don’t care about our children. Every mother is different and what feels right in her gut is something that only she can determine. For me, I am proud to be a mother who works. That is what feels right to me. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t come without sacrifice or challenge. Sometimes it takes a village to coordinate client meetings, make sports practices and still get dinner on the table. But at the end of the day when the kids are asleep and I sit down with a glass of wine, my soul feels fulfilled in a way that it wouldn’t should kids and work not co-exist.

I am continually inspired by the group of working women at A.wordsmith, and I am proud of the model we have in place. A model that has brought out some of the most talented professionals I know, who also happen to be amazing moms. Thank you to Katharine Zaleski for your honestly and candor about being a working mother and for pushing open the door for women just a bit wider.