Social Media

3 Ways Glossier is Owning their Strategic Communications

Working in office situation

Working in the field of PR and communications, it’s interesting and refreshing to observe companies who “get it”. I have to admit to personally being a fan of Glossier and their products – but their smart approach to thought leadership, communications and social media is equally as engaging from a business perspective. Glossier effortlessly and expertly weaves together all the elements that support strategic communications – and as someone that falls directly into their customer target, I can tell you it’s working.

Glossier CEO and Founder Emily Weiss started the company after years of running a highly successful beauty blog called Into the Gloss. The blog was built around interviews with women from all walks of life, providing peeks into their beauty routines and products. Eventually, Weiss saw a gap in the beauty industry and created her own products that she felt would best appeal to what her readers were missing.

Emily Weiss, photo credit: Entrepreneur

Emily Weiss, photo credit: Entrepreneur

Elevating their leader

Weiss had a thought leadership advantage with Into the Gloss – she’d already established herself as an industry expert before she launched any products.  Into the Gloss still plays a crucial role in Weiss and Glossier’s thought leadership. The blog is fully established as a stand-alone expert source referring readers to a wide range of products, from beauty store moisturizers to exotic skin serums.  While Into the Gloss is closely tied to the Glossier brand, I’m often surprised how little they push their own products, obviously being conscious of being over “sales-y”.

Weiss’s thought leadership is not limited to the realms of make-up and self-care. She presents herself as a business thought leader as well. She’s established herself as an expert on building a socially driven beauty brand as well as a successful woman entrepreneur who secured $24 million in B series funding last November. Weiss frequently posts about speaking engagements, business events she attends.

Finally, Glossier’s thought leadership includes multiple members of their staff recognizing their value and influence in the company’s success. While Weiss is the face of the company, Into the Gloss and their social channels regularly feature the different areas of their team, from IT to product development to administration.

Social, Social, Social.

Glossier’s social media is a case study for everything social can be. It’s valuable and engaging, attractive and pristinely branded. While it may look effortless, it’s clearly methodical and well-planned.

They’re Instagram story experts – whether giving an inside look into the office or creating mini-videos about different products.  Users are engaged with reoccurring posts such as #wallpaperfridays where Glossier features a new image followers can screen cap for personal use. The images always fit within the overall branding.

Glossier makes use of user generated content and routinely quotes customer feedback. Weiss is quoted in a Fast Company article saying: “We think of things from a content perspective: How would this show up in a user-generated photo?” Smart.  User generated content not only builds rapport with customers (most millennial users love having their photo shared with 690,000 people), but also demonstrates how willing their customers are to share their involvement with the brand. Glossier’s social channels feature photos and videos of customers using their products.

glossier insta 2Glossier insta1

Killer Content (visual and copy)

Glossier’s brand voice is conversational and witty. Their website reads like a conversation you would have with your confident, takes-no-BS best friend. In an interview with Tech Crunch, Weiss said Glossier approaches content as talking to a customer as one would text a friend. This approach is evident everywhere – from social media to product descriptions.

Here’s some examples of their website copy.

“We Make Emails: “We do this thing where we send email updates on stuff you’ll probably want to know about: new products, Into The Gloss posts, promos, and parties. Unsubscribe anytime.”

Balm Dot Com product description: “Opt for Original, or choose from five mood-enhancing flavors: Birthday (inspired by Milk Bar’s famous cake, with subtle shimmer), Rose (with a barely-there pink tint), Cherry (with a sheer, juicy red tint), Mint, and Coconut. The lip-smacking 11-year-old in you is freaking out right now. Collect them all!”

Glossier describes themselves perfectly with this description: “We’re the beauty brand that wants to be friends with you—mostly because we’re not so much a brand as we are real people over here just trying to rethink the beauty industry and have a good time doing it.”

Glossier, I want to be your friend too.

 

3 examples of PR crises from well-intentioned brands

PR crisis

Most brands understand the need for PR crisis plans, and build strategies around a number of scenarios; an employee goes rogue, a customer takes up a personal vendetta on social media, etc. What many don’t plan for, however, is their own well-intentioned ad campaigns turning against them.

When launching a new ad strategy, many marketers’ biggest fear is a campaign that flops. Low ROI or wasted budget are definitely issues, but a bigger problem might be looming – a self-created crisis. Sometimes, even with honorable goals (like promoting unity and acceptance of diversity), things can go awry. Here are three examples from this year of brands campaigns that needed an extra round of review.

  • Adidas’ Boston Marathon email | Adidas wanted to congratulate this year’s Boston Marathon participants on their awesome achievement, and offer the opportunity to snag some official event gear to celebrate. Unfortunately, whoever drafted the subject line for the email containing this information should have taken a second look before sending. The phrase “Congrats, you survived the Boston Marathon!” was met with backlash – the poor choice of words seemed callous in light of 2013’s Boston Marathon bombing. Adidas did provide an example of how to respond to a crisis correctly, however. The company immediately issued an apology and took full responsibility for the mistake, saying “Clearly, there was no thought given to the insensitive email subject line we sent.”

 

  • Dove’s “Real Beauty” bottles | For over a decade, Dove has been leading the body-positive movement for brands with its Real Beauty campaigns – which have generally been well-received. However, the campaigns latest iteration not only didn’t resonate, it caused consumers to question how much Dove really knew about body positivity. The company released a limited run of its body wash in varying sizes and shapes of bottles, meant to evoke the idea that “there is no one perfect shape.” Instead, consumers found the bottles patronizing and suggested that they actually encourage women to compare themselves to others, which is the opposite of what body positivity hopes to achieve.

 

  • Pepsi’s Kendall Jenner commercial | Already 2017’s likely candidate for most tone-deaf ad of the year, Pepsi’s April commercial featuring Kendall Jenner struck out on nearly every front possible. The spot features Jenner leaving a photoshoot to march alongside protestors who are being blocked by police. Jenner then presents a can of Pepsi to one of the officers, who sips it and smiles – and then both sides celebrate. In the current political climate, the ad seems incredibly silly and trivializes major issues. The Kardashian/Jenner clan, while a social media powerhouse, can also be a polarizing force. Add in backlash from Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter, and you have a recipe for disaster. Pepsi ultimately pulled the spot.

#TwitterIsDead – or is it?

Twitter is dead

 

Since launching in 2006, Twitter has gone through several identity crises. Starting as an SMS-type messaging system, the platform has grown to be an emergency messaging tool, an engagement platform for live events, and apparently, the platform of choice for announcing domestic and foreign policies by the current President of the United States. With the platform’s growth has come challenges; beyond the struggles of stock prices and pleasing investors, Twitter has dealt with censorship and terrorism issues. After 11 years, are these challenges proving to be too much? Is Twitter “over?”

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Twitter’s Rise

Though Facebook was already staking a claim as THE social network, Twitter succeed in its early years by offering a different social experience and not competing with Facebook directly. It quickly became popular with conference and event goers, and saw more than 60,000 related tweets per day during the 2007 South by Southwest event. Within the last few years, brands have discovered the power of Twitter as a customer service tool, and the platform has responded by creating more robust tools for this purpose. Things continued to go so well that the company became public in 2013 with its IPO.

Twitter’s impact hasn’t been limited to events and branding. In 2011, Twitter played a major role in the Arab Spring; people used the platform to connect, mobilize, and influence change. During natural disasters and other major events, users are able to receive Twitter Alerts to get up to the minute instructions and information. The world can use Twitter to connect and organize on important events and issues. Unfortunately, this means the world can use Twitter as a force for the other side of the coin too.

Twitter’s Fall

Twitter takes a strong stance for net neutrality and anti-censorship. In an effort to protect average citizens’ voices and ability to speak their minds freely, “undesirables” get to have their say, too. Terrorists and groups like Hezbollah are active on Twitter, and frequently use the platform to organize their supporters and promote their viewpoints – one Hezbollah related account has nearly half a million followers. In the United States, the “alt-right” movement has a large presence on Twitter, and frequently makes use of popular hashtags to get their Tweets a wider reach. It’s unfortunately difficult to find worthwhile #MondayMotivation and #WednesdayWisdom tweets among the political debates commandeering the hashtags. While some accounts have been suspended for violating Twitter’s terms of service, the bans are frequently temporary.

These struggles harm Twitter’s own brand image, and their stock has suffered along with it. Since launching their IPO, the company saw an all-time high of $69 per share in 2014, and has trended down ever since; the current price sits around $16. To help boost their numbers and attempt to draw advertisers back in, Twitter recently began testing a $99 a month subscription service for advertisers. The service automatically promotes tweets and profiles without needing to create dedicated ads (which can be off-putting to users). Time will tell if the platforms’ power users and brands will buy in.

 

Twitter will continue to struggle to find a balance between their investors, the brands that advertise on the platform, freedom of speech, and avoiding the promotion of hate and terrorism. It isn’t the only social media platform struggling with these challenges, and the next few years will see more shifts and new definitions for the role of social in our lives. Still, not all is lost, especially for those of us the public relations and media world. Twitter is still a great place for PR pros and journalists to connect, and it still has major value as a customer service tool for brands. While it may not be the first option to dump all your ad budget into, their $99 subscription service shows forward thinking that can help brands connect with consumers more authentically. Twitter has definite challenges, but it’s not on its last legs yet.

Top Reaction Gifs for the format’s 30th Anniversary

30th anniversary of the GIF

In honor of the 30th anniversary of the GIF this week, Facebook has added a GIF button directly to the comment bar – making it easier than ever to interact visually on the platform. It’s hard to deny the impact that GIFs have had in recent years on modern social media culture, no matter what side of the pronunciation debate you stand on (personally, I think it’s JIF, like the peanut butter). Take a look at a few facts that make GIFs so powerful for social sharing:

 

30th anniversary of the GIF

Need a few GIFs to get your sharing started? Here’s some of our favorites:

 

Peggy from Mad Men

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Jimmy Fallon Happy Dance

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Captain Picard Facepalm

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

JACK NICHOLSON WOAH

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

High Five

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Raven Symone

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Jennifer Lawrence OK

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Simpsons MWUAH

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Computer Kid

30th anniversary of the GIF

 

Kermit at Work

30th anniversary of the GIF

The Difficult Relationship Between Brands & YouTube Creators

youtube advertising

Every day, YouTube users watch nearly 5 billion videos. Since its inception in 2005, YouTube has become a culture-shaping video mecca that has created a new category of “celebrity.” Brands have jumped into the YouTube pool with both feet, taking advantage of those 5 billion daily views with ad buys on the videos of popular YouTube Creators and branded content of their own. From gaming “Let’s Plays” to beauty tutorials to snarky commentary on politics to the latest viral meme, influencers are creating content that brands want to be a part of. And YouTube creators have made lucrative careers from the brands’ ad dollars: in 2016, the highest earning personality was PewDiePie, who brought in $15 million last year.

But in 2017, all has not been well in the YouTube land. Due to several controversies (including one surrounding the aforementioned PewDiePie), the relationship between advertisers and creators (and the relationship between both of those parties and YouTube itself) has become strained. The issues could have far-reaching implications for net neutrality, influencer marketing, and the future of video on social media. Both creators and brands need each other to win the YouTube game, but struggle to define who is truly in charge.

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The “Adpocalypse:” Creators need brands

In March of this year, YouTube and parent company Google had a full blown crisis on their hands: major brands were pulling their advertising due to Google’s inability to ensure that their ads didn’t end up playing in front of racist and offensive content. However, the issue wasn’t as cut -and-dry as advertisers wanted it to be; part of the issue is how Google can define and label offensive content.

Some videos are obviously offensive – those that contain extreme violence, gore, harassment, and blatant racist content are videos that advertisers (and probably the general public) don’t want to see monetized. However, in YouTube’s efforts to soothe brands’ fears, some of their most popular creators suddenly found their ad revenue tanking. Creators complained that the new “hate speech” algorithm was blocking their content unfairly, and taking video titles and content out of context. Several also pointed out that while their videos were being demonetized for things like violent content in a video game or “jokes” they said were taken out of context, the YouTube channels of news outlets that often show violent imagery and music videos with overtly sexual content still had ads attached.

YouTube creators are most successful when they create and share content with authenticity and connection to their audience. Sometimes, this includes content that isn’t “PG-13,” and brands may not want their logo and name associated with it. Staying true to their audience can come at a cost for creators, especially those who rely on YouTube for their livelihood.

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Cutting the cable cord: Brand need creators

According to a survey in 2016, younger generations watch 2.5 time more internet video than cable TV. In fact, YouTube is the most viewed platform among this demographic – also beating out Netflix, Facebook, and Hulu. Millennials and Generation Z are spending their time with their favorite influencers on YouTube, who are more likely to personally connect with them on social media than an A-list celebrity in the newest show on AMC. They trust these YouTube creators because they can connect with them on a personal level.

As Generation Z comes of age and begins wielding more purchasing power, brands are realizing they need to reach these consumers where they live. Consumers aren’t seeking out brands anymore, and they don’t like traditional advertising. Longer ads on YouTube often come with the option to skip them, but most users will still see a few seconds of an ad before skipping it to get to their video. A well-made ad can still make an impact in those few seconds, and potentially be seen by millions of users when played in front of videos by YouTube’s most popular personalities.

For brands looking to build an even stronger connection, product placements are alive and well on YouTube. Influencer partnerships can take time to build, and creators are often picky about the brands they work with – the products need to be authentic to their persona on YouTube. Not every popular YouTuber is a fit for this type of promotion, either. Those who don’t focus lifestyle content may not have audiences that expect or even accept product promotion.

Companies who pull regular advertising due to concerns about the content on YouTube can run into a new challenge as well if they want to work with these influencers directly. Creators affected by a lack of ad revenue due to brands pulling their campaigns might not be inclined to partner with brands in other capacities – why would they support the brands that don’t support the platform their career is based on? If ad revenues continue to dip or stay stagnant, many popular creators will be seeking greener pastures, and diversifying their careers. There may not be creators for brands to partner with at all in the future.

The balance

Google and YouTube have the difficult task of balancing the authenticity and creativity that made YouTube so popular with the need to assure brands that their reputation isn’t at risk by purchasing ad space. The second half of 2017 will likely define YouTube’s future, as well as the future of influencer relations in marketing. The current situation is sticky – all three parties (creators, brands, and YouTube) need each other, but also need to put their own interests first. Internet video is still a bit Wild West – and YouTube will have to find a way to balance the creators’ desire to keep it that way and brands’ desire to reign it in.

 

Customer Service on Snapchat

snapchat customer service

In its short history, Snapchat has grown from a novelty app to a social media platform in which brands are eager to pioneer new styles of social media campaigns. From branded lens and geofilters, to influencer “story takeovers” and specialized in-app ads, there’s a multitude of ways for brands to utilize Snapchat. Users on Snapchat tend to be digital natives, younger and turned off by traditional advertising. They expect personal connections from the brands they love and buy from. Snapchat is a natural platform for these connections, and some brands are taking it to the next level by using the app as a customer service tool.

Brands have already discovered that Twitter makes a great customer service tool and allows for quick responses – but it doesn’t allow for voice or face-to-face conversations. Early adopters of Snapchat are discovering that the platform offers the direct connection of Twitter, with the added benefit of video to help solve customer issues, and puts a friendly face on customer service. Here are three ways brands are elevating customer experience through Snapchat.

customer service

Troubleshoot customer service problems with video

For certain consumer and B2B brands, troubleshooting product issues can be difficult over the phone. But busy consumers often don’t have time to come back into the shop, ship the product back, or make an appointment to have their defective product looked at. Forward-thinking companies like iOgrapher are experimenting with applying Snapchat’s convenient video messaging to their troubleshooting process. Customers with concerns can make a short Snapchat video describing the problem and send it directly to the business’ account. This is convenient for both customer and business: The consumer gets a quick, easy way to send in a “support ticket,” and the business gets a physical look at what the problem is, rather than trying to decipher the issue over email or phone. While this might be difficult for one customer service rep to manage for large corporations (and the multitude of customer issues they respond to daily), small to mid-size startups and businesses can use the platform as a free tool to connect to consumers where they are and respond in a more personal way.

Phone calls without a call center

Occasionally, customers don’t need (or want) to use a video to discuss the challenges they’re having with a product – a phone call can suffice. But some call center systems can be frustrating to deal with, and no one enjoys listening to hold music for 20-30 minutes while they wait to speak to an actual human. Using Snapchat’s phone call feature, brands can connect with customers on an app they’re already spending time on. Brands need to connect with their audiences where they “live” – and that probably isn’t on an automated phone system.

Tutorials and guides

Particularly with beauty, food and health products, consumers love to see real people using and explaining products before they make a purchase. Whether it’s showcasing the variety of ways to use a hairstyling product or sharing a recipe using a new food item, brands can build goodwill by helping their customers learn how to use what they sell more efficiently. Snapchat is a perfect platform for tutorial videos. Brands can use their own staff or partner with popular influencers and offer tutorial videos for their followers. When advertised beforehand on other social platforms, brands can ensure an audience for their Snapchat story (which will only stay live for 24 hours).

 

Though still in its early stages (and facing strong competition from Instagram’s Stories), Snapchat is still growing in popularity, especially among the younger age set. Brands who jump in now will be ahead of many companies, and will be able to experiment and pave the way in this new field of customer service. Customers will continue to demand personal, authentic connections, and brands that adapt to these needs will only benefit.

Celebrity Endorsements: The Risk for Brands

celebrity endsorement

Celebrity endorsements have been used by brands since the 1760s, when a savvy pottery and chinaware company used endorsements from royalty to promote their products.  In more recent decades, celebrity endorsement has become a staple for many large brands, like Michael Jordan’s partnership with Nike. As social media has grown into a part of everyday life, the celebrity endorsement has adapted along with the digital world. With this shift has come new ways for brands and the influencers they partner with to connect with their audiences – and new ways for their influencers to crash, burn, and create a crisis.

Social media is all about personal connections, and it allows celebrities a chance to offer a sneak peek into their real life (or at least the sanitized version of their real life). It helps their fans relate to them in ways that regular advertising can’t, and creates a golden opportunity for brands. Brand endorsements, when presented through the lens of a celebrity’s personal, authentic recommendation on their personal social media channels can be a powerful form of marketing. But with this power comes the risk for it to fail on an epic scale when transparency and authenticity aren’t a key focus.

Fyre Festival’s lack of transparency

In April, the “luxurious” Fyre Festival made history – but not for the reasons they’d hoped. The “festival” basically didn’t even exist, and the exceptional music, food, and fun that their celebrity brand influencers promised were nowhere to be found. As the word spread, the organizers weren’t only faced with the obvious issue of not delivering the promised product – all but one of their hired influencers conveniently forgot to mention that their social media posts were sponsored.

While a brand and influencer may worry that tagging their sponsored post as the ad it is could harm the audience’s perception, the opposite is often true. Social media users don’t like to be lied to, and are still receptive to influencer content even when it’s clearly called out. Though the festival organize claim to be trying again next year, the damage caused by the lack of transparency by their influencers is already done – and the pending lawsuits for FTC violations aren’t helping matters.

“Bow Wow’s” lack of authenticity

While rapper Shad Moss (also known as Lil Bow Wow) wasn’t promoting a brand when he posted on Instagram about the flight he was taking to NYC via private jet, brands he’s worked with in the past could be at risk thanks to the reveal that he was lying.

Moss was indeed on a flight to NYC, but it wasn’t via private jet. Unfortunately for him, a fan of his noticed him on the flight, and noticed the post he’d made – and called him out on Snapchat.

The internet soon piled on to make fun of Moss’ photo with the #BowWowChallenge. There might not be a ton of animosity toward the rapper for fudging the truth, but it’s hurt his credibility, and could hurt the brands he partners with in the future.

The solution: micro-influencers

So, how can brands still get the benefit of social media influence, and collapsing on a large scale when their celebrity partner slips up? There’s three keys to consider:

  • Insist on transparency. All sponsored content must be tagged as such, no exceptions.
  • Carefully vet the influencers chosen – does their history match your brand values?
  • Consider micro-influencers instead.

Micro-influencers don’t have the millions of followers that some celebrities do, but this could actually be a plus for brands. They’re able to connect with their fans even more closely, and are likely to hold transparency and authenticity in high regard because of this. Money isn’t the only thing they’re concerned about – they also vet the brands the work with to ensure that the partnership is a match for their image too. And, if they do have an unfortunate flub, it’s probably not going to be on the same scale that an A or B list celebrity would. Brands should consider their influencers close partners, and require that they uphold the brand’s values – and influencers should do the same for the companies they work with.

Influencer Marketing for Small Businesses

influencer marketing

Influencer marketing is a priority for brands in 2017. In 2016, influencers emerged as a powerhouse for brands looking to reach millennials in the personalized, authentic way that they desire. Celebrity endorsements have always been a tool for marketers with the right budget, but influencer marketing takes this concept to the next level. It combines star power with the more casual endorsement you get from word of mouth – social media influencers are typically much more connected to and familiar with their fans than A-list celebrities are. While some social media stars command big pay checks from the huge brands they work with, there are thousands of micro-influencers that are more easily accessible to small businesses with limited budgets.

Influencers with millions of followers aren’t right for every brand. Micro-influencers in specific industries are not only more affordable for smaller businesses, they’re more likely to reach the people who will become actual customers. Micro-influencers are often cheaper for businesses to work with, and may even do partnerships for free products or services. In exchange, they can offer direct, personal connections with consumers businesses may struggle to reach efficiently otherwise. Their reviews of products are much more authentic than major influencers with millions of followers that they definitely can’t connect with individually.

How to Find Micro-Influencers

You can find influencers who would be a great fit for your business in a variety of ways, ranging from free options to purchasing tools built for this purpose.

  • Start with your own followers: Take a look through your own fans on social media. For followers who have a few thousand followers of their own, and are already fans of your business, a partnership with your brand could be a natural choice for them.
  • Connect with local bloggers: Google is your friend here – search for popular local bloggers in your area. If their content is a fit, check out how they prefer to connect.
  • Hashtags: On Instagram and Twitter, browse popular hashtags related to your brand’s products. Chances are, some of the top tweets come from influencers in these topics.
  • Buy a tool to help: Buy a subscription to a service like Klear to get a more in-depth look at who holds influence in your industry.

 

What to Expect

When working with influencers, it’s important to pursue an authentic, mutually beneficial relationship. Treat influencers with respect, and they’ll be more open to working with you. Here’s what to keep in mind:

  • Research how the influencer prefers to be contacted, and respect what types of partnerships they’re willing to do.
  • Do your due diligence and research the influencer’s history and past brand sponsorships. This can help avoid a crisis for your brand later.
  • Plan to build a relationship over time. Influencers may not be open to a partnership right away, even if you’re willing to pay. They need to get to know your business first, and understand if it works with their brand.
  • Make sure all posts from your influencer clearly state their relationship to your brand – transparency pays off with your audience and avoids legal issues.
  • Ideally, plan for a long-term relationship and not a one-off sponsorship.

Dark Social: Digital Word of Mouth

Cellars

“Dark social” isn’t as malicious as it sounds. The term was coined by Alexis Madrigal in an article for The Atlantic in 2012 to describe the sharing of information in emails and instant messengers – sharing that existed long before social media platforms were popular. Social media ROI is getting easier to measure, but dark social is more difficult. And it accounts for a huge portion of the referrals your website is probably getting.

When looking through your Google Analytics, you probably notice a large chunk of the referrals are listed in the “direct traffic” category. These hits can come from a variety of behind-the-scenes sources; a link shared through text, email, native mobile apps (like Facebook’s), messengers, Slack messages, Snapchat, and someone using a secure HTTPS browser all fall in this bucket. It’s word of mouth on the internet, but not the kind you can track easily through Facebook Insights.

The Struggle for Social Media Strategists

While it’s great to have so many avenues for your content to be shared, dark social adds to the struggle for social media teams in proving the value of what they do. If you can’t specifically show that these direct traffic hits are from people copying and sharing a link you put on Facebook, it’s tough to show true ROI. Social media marketers are under a lot of pressure to show concrete metrics, which is sometimes next to impossible. There’s no real way to say “yes, all of these direct traffic hits were from text messages sent in this market.”

texting

Dark social can also make optimizing content tough. Without knowing how the content is being shared specifically, marketers can’t design it for those platforms. These shares are likely hitting demographics that may not be on other social channels, like the 55 and older age group. When you can’t pin down the audience and the channel, it’s difficult to be strategic.

Shining the Light on Dark Social

So, what can PR pros and marketers do about dark social? Here’s a few things to focus on to get a better handle on this type of sharing:

  • Use Google Analytics’ customer URL builder. This can help with proving that your social sharing is driving dark social communication, and which posts are bringing in the most referrals. No matter where the link is clicked from, you’ll be able to see that it was that specific link you created for your latest Facebook post that brought visitors to the website.

 

google analytics

  • Invest in a tool made for dark social tracking, like st by Radium One.
  • Make shareable content a priority. Even when it’s hard to track, dark social is still sharing of your content. Make sure your social posts are shareable – find the emotional connection, keep text short, and include visuals whenever possible. You might not be able to optimize it for a Snapchat message, but you can still focus on creating content that resonates with your audience, no matter where they are.

How to tie your social media strategy to your SEO

social media and seo

Public relations and marketing professionals have learned over the last few years that they can’t exist in silos and get exceptional results for their brands. Integrated strategies are vital for success. PR and marketing live in different sandboxes, but they have to learn how to play well together. This is particularly clear with the relationship between social media and SEO. These two areas can and do exist separately, but when paired together can produce stronger results for both teams.

Both social media and SEO are part of a long-term strategy. You might not get a million followers or a hundred new links within a month, but with the right foundation, these strategies can bolster your brand reputation and bring in new customers and leads. Together, these two tools can expand and strengthen the “touch points” where your customer interacts with your brand. With enough “touches” over time, you can create dedicated and repeat customers. Here are three tips for tying your social media strategy to your SEO plan.

Choose the right platforms, get them on brand, and update regularly

You don’t have to be on every single social media platform, but the ones you have add links to your online presence. Choose the ones that are right for your brand and focus on doing those platforms well. Make sure your content is planned out and integrated into your overall communications strategy. Update each platform regularly and with content targeted to your specific audiences on each channel. Facebook is different than LinkedIn, and LinkedIn is different than Pinterest, so be sure to craft and fine tune content for each. Be sure that the branding, logos, and overall tone of voice match across each platform. When someone Googles your company, they may click the Facebook link rather than your website link; be sure they get the same story and message (just honed for Facebook etiquette) that they would from your homepage.

Create shareable and engaging content

With social media, crafting and posting your content is step one. Step two is getting engagement, shares, and mentions from your followers – and in turn, boosted SEO results. The more people publicly share your content, the more links and mentions are available for your brand, which helps boost your reputation with search engines. To get your followers to share your content, it needs to be right for the platform, relatable, and well crafted. Sharing content on social media as an individual is often an endorsement of the thoughts and ideas within – it has to be great for your followers to associate with it. Posts that are short and succinct and include a photo or video are more shareable. It also helps if your content is tied into current social media and pop culture trends that are relevant to your brand.

Use your keywords on social

Though there have been changes in the way SEO works, a good portion of it comes back to the keywords you want to be tied to and optimizing your content with these keywords. This is also true on social media; you want your posts to be searchable by the keywords your brand is focusing on. Once you have a solid idea of the keywords your SEO campaign is targeting, find authentic ways to work them in to your social media content. This is particularly helpful on Pinterest and YouTube, where users are often searching for new content by keywords. It can also work on Facebook and Twitter, especially if your pages are well done and have a good reputation with search engines.